Unscheduled Care in Wales

A&E sign at a hospital.
  • Pembrokeshire Coast National Park Authority – Sustainable Tourism: report cover and Audit Wales logo
    Pembrokeshire Coast National Park Authority – Sustainable Tourism
  • Swansea Bay University Health Board – Annual Audit Report 2021: report cover showing Audit Wales logo
    Swansea Bay University Health Board – Annual Audit Report 2021
  • Powys Teaching Health Board – Annual Audit Report 2021: report cover showing Audit Wales logo
    Powys Teaching Health Board – Annual Audit Report 2021
  • Swansea Bay University Health Board – Structured Assessment 2021 (Phase  Two) – Corporate Governance and  Financial Management Arrangements
    Swansea Bay University Health Board – Structured Assessment 2021 (…
  • Powys Teaching Health Board – Structured Assessment 2021 (Phase Two) – Corporate Governance and Financial Management Arrangements:
    Powys Teaching Health Board – Structured Assessment 2021 (Phase Two…
Unscheduled Care in Wales
21 April 2022

A system under real pressure

Unscheduled care covers any unplanned, urgent, and emergency care provided by healthcare services. It can cover a variety of conditions but essentially refers to care which needs to be provided quickly, or in some cases immediately. 

As part of launching that work, we’ve published a data tool and an accompanying blog. The tool compiles data from across the unscheduled care system in Wales and provides a snapshot of how the system is coping.  

View our unscheduled care data tool [opens in new window].

View our blog.

What did we find?

The data in our new tool confirms an unscheduled care system under real pressure, with patients waiting a long time to receive an ambulance or be treated in an A&E department and high staff absence rates.

In February 2022, some of the most concerning points include:

  • 58% of people attending an A&E department were seen within four hours. 75% of patients were seen within eight hours with 84% seen within 12 hours.  
  • just over one in two (55%) of red calls received an ambulance within eight minutes.  
  • 95% of ‘amber 1’ calls were responded to within five hours and for ‘amber 2’ calls within 12 hours, with 469 people across both categories waiting over 12 hours for a response. 
  • the ambulance service lost 23,214 hours to handover delays, the highest number recorded to date. That equates to an average of 827 hours a day. 
Unscheduled Care in Wales – a system under real pressure

Data Analytics Tools

  • A&E sign outside a hospital.
    Unscheduled Care in Wales
    The tool compiles data from across the unscheduled care system in Wales and provides a snapshot of how the system is coping.
    Tool Published 21/04/2022

We'd like your feedback